Vienna Supreme Concerts

Select a Month
30
May
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
31
May
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
2
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
3
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
4
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
6
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
7
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
8
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
9
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
12
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
13
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
14
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
15
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
16
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
17
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
18
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
20
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
22
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
23
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
25
Jun
Palais Eschenbach
Start: 20:15
44,00 88,00 
Vienna Supreme Concerts:

A Night to Remember: Vienna Supreme Orchestra

Immerse yourself in the enchanting world of Vienna with the Vienna Supreme Orchestra. This orchestra, boasting exceptional education, international concert experience, and a quintessentially Viennese interpretation, offers a truly unique Viennese experience, always striving for musical perfection. Join the Vienna Supreme Orchestra and its talented soloists for an extraordinary evening, where you can bask in the joy, optimism, and sophistication of this magnificent city.

One of the most renowned operettas composed by Johann Strauss is “The Bat,” which made its splendid debut in Vienna in 1874 and is often hailed as “The Queen of Operettas.” Its overture stands as one of Strauss’s most magnificent creations, a virtuosic masterpiece that poses a challenge even to the most accomplished musicians. This comedic and bourgeois depiction of 18th-century Vienna graces the stages of theaters, particularly during the carnival and New Year’s Eve festivities.

In May of 1874, Johann Strauss Jr. held his inaugural concert in Italy, where lemons blossomed. For this special occasion, he composed a waltz initially named “Bella Italia” for his Italian audience. Upon returning to Vienna, inspired by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s mignon “Do you know the land where the lemons blossom?” he rechristened the piece “Where the Lemons Blossom.”

The Sound of Music – The Viennese waltz traces its roots back to the 12th and 13th centuries, primarily evolving from the traditional “Dreher” or “Ländler” dances, which held significant importance in folklore until the 19th century. The most famous “Ländler,” featured in the 1965 film “The Sound of Music,” transports you back in time by nearly 900 years.

Jacques Offenbach, a German-French composer credited as the pioneer of modern operetta, left an indelible mark on musical history. His repertoire includes classics such as the “Can-Can” from “Orpheus in the Underworld” and the “Barcarole” from “The Tales of Hoffmann.” In 1863, Johann Strauss Jr. met Offenbach in Vienna, and the latter’s influential words, “you have to write operettas,” significantly shaped Strauss’s career. In February 1871, Johann Strauss Jr. premiered his first operetta, “Indigo and the 40 Thieves.”

“The Magic Flute” remains Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s most frequently performed opera worldwide, premiering in Vienna in 1791 to instant acclaim. Vienna’s Clown and Magicians opera scene, thriving in the late 18th century, is characterized by templates where love triumphs against all odds and threats.

Highlights of the Program – Vienna Supreme Concert Tickets

“The Blue Danube Waltz,” composed by Johann Strauss Jr., stands as Austria’s unofficial anthem, played every New Year’s Eve at midnight, considered a harbinger of good luck for the year ahead.

The “Turkish March,” also known as “Rondo Alla Turca,” constitutes the third movement of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Sonata No. 11 in A major, composed in Vienna in 1783/84. This movement encapsulates the magical blend of lightness, joy, elegance, and rhythmic motion that characterizes Mozart’s music.

Johann Strauss Sr.’s “Radetzky March,” dedicated to Field Marshal Graf Radetzky von Radetz, concludes the Vienna Philharmonic’s annual New Year’s Concert, thanks to its distinctive rhythm (tatadám, tatadám, tatadámdámdám = 3 Anapests and 1 Iambus), contributing significantly to its enduring popularity.

Leave Your Mail, We'll keep you updated